Boutique mexicaine

Products sent directly from Mexico

  • Français (French)
  • English
The mole (chocolate sauce, mexican mole) is one of the most representative dishes of great Mexican cuisine, recently recognized by UNESCO as a cultural heritage of mankind.
The mole (chocolate sauce, mexican mole)
The mole (chocolate sauce, mexican mole) is one of the most representative dishes of great Mexican cuisine, recently recognized by UNESCO as a cultural heritage of mankind.

The first mentions of what we know today as "mole" are found in the General History of the Things of New Spain, by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún.
These writings mention a pre-Hispanic stew offered to Moctezuma, prepared with a chili sauce called chilmulli or chilmole, from which it follows that the word mulli means sauce.
These mullis were also prepared by the merchants or pochtecas after a long and successful trip, as a token of gratitude to the gods.

Over time, any sauce made by mixing chilies, pepitas, tomatoes and spices was generically called mulli or mole, although the preparation and ingredients of each varied considerably according to the region as well as their thick or thick consistency. They were served as an accompaniment to venison, armadillo, iguana, duck, frog, xoloiscuincle and turkey meats.

From the conquest and during the colonial period, these recipes were taken by the indigenous cooks to the Creole houses and convents, especially from Puebla de los Angeles, the first New-Hispanic city, incorporating ingredients brought from Europe and Asia, but respecting the original concept : a sauce of fresh or dried chilies, ground tomatoes or tomatoes, condiments such as epazote leaves, holy grass or avocado, and occasionally, corn dough, toasted tortilla, pumpkin seed or peanut to thicken the sauce. With it were dressed poultry (mainly turkey), pork, beef, fish and vegetables.

Its popularity spread throughout the Mesoamerican zone during four centuries, which originated a great amount of different recipes.

In 1872, a recipe called Arte Novísimo de Cocina mentioned for the first time the use of cocoa in the preparation of the mole, presumably as another alternative to thicken it and give it a less spicy taste. This confirms to us that chocolate is not a fundamental ingredient in the preparation of the first moles, as is presently believed, but only one more addition in terms of perfecting the recipe for certain types of mole.

Much has also been speculated about the origin of the recipe of the mole poblano, perhaps the most popular mole in our country. Legend has it that one day, Juan de Palafox, Viceroy of New Spain and Archbishop of Puebla, visited his diocese, so a great banquet was organized in a certain Franciscan convent. The cook in charge of preparing the main dishes was Fray Pascual, who in the rush and nervousness to finish in time, stumbled in the kitchen and threw the ingredients into the pot where the guajolotes were cooked. Chilies, spices, cacao and other inputs fell straight into the stew. Faced with such a disaster, Fray Pascual simply prays with devotion to get out of the problem and, when proving the result of the accident, realizes that the dish has an incomparable flavor. The Archbishop is completely pleased with the banquet and since then the recipe has become a great discovery and is present in each of the important celebrations.

Another similar legend suggests of mole of Mexico is that the wonderful dish was not created by Fray Pascual but by Sister Andrea de la Encarnación, in the talavera kitchens of the Santa Rosa Convent in Puebla. In the process of preparation, Sr. Andrea, along with her group of cooks, carefully add each of the ingredients to its creation. The smell that is fired throughout the convent attracts other nuns who, when they reach the kitchen and see the mother grinding the chiles minutely, commented: "Mother, what a good mole", to which Sister Andrea replies: "It is millet, Mother, but thank you for naming my dish. " And so, as we are told, the name mole arises.

Apart from the fun and anecdotal character of these legends, the historical records are very clear as to the true origin and evolution of the mole as we know it today, whatever its form of preparation, as it emphasizes the creativity of Mexican cuisine



























Camotes Mexican Candy
Camotes Mexican Candy
2.65
Candy mazapan
Candy mazapan
8.60
Amaranto chocolate
Amaranto chocolate
8.25
Tamalitos tamarindo
Tamalitos tamarindo
9.75
Palanqueta pumpkin seed
Palanqueta pumpkin seed
8.24
Mexican candy Amaranto
Mexican candy Amaranto
11.60